Brunch, Cakes, Cakes and Desserts, fruit, Recipes

Dried Fruit and Ginger Heavy Cream Cake

Noticing I somehow accumulated quite a few small quantities of different dried fruit, I decided the best way to use them was in a cake.

This time, I wasn’t aiming at a moist cake, but rather, a cake with somewhat drier texture, that will hold the dried fruit well. Heavy cream cake came to mind, as it gives exactly the texture I was looking for.

Using heavy cream in the batter makes preparing the cake easier and faster than most, as no creaming of butter is needed.

As I was about to add candied ginger to the dried fruit mix, I quickly added some ginger powder to the batter, to give the cake a nice gingery kick.

The cake is not overly sweet, with each type of dried fruit adding a different layer of flavor and color to it. It is perfect for serving with hot tea or coffee any time of the day. Try it and enjoy.

 

Notes:

* For the dried fruit mix, I’ve used dried apricots, dried sweetened cranberries, candied oranges, golden raisins, dark raisins, coconut strips and candied ginger. Any other fruit combination can be used instead.

* Pearl sugar is a special sugar that keeps its white color and shape while baking. It can be found in specialty stores or online.

 

 

Makes: 1 loaf pan (12-14 portions)

Prep time: 15 minutes

Baking time: 50 minutes

 

Ingredients:

1¼ cups roughly chopped dried fruit (see notes)

1 Tbs cornstarch

3 L eggs

1 tsp vanilla

1¼ cups sugar

1¼ cups heavy cream, at room temperature

2 cups flour

1 Tbs baking powder

¼ tsp salt

1 tsp ginger powder

2 Tbs pearl sugar (see notes)

 

  1. Preheat the oven to 355F (180C). Brush a 10” (25cm) loaf pan with a thin layer of soft butter, and dust with flour. Turn upside down and tap over the pan, to get rid of excess flour. Keep in the fridge until using.
  2. In a small bowl, mix the dried fruit with the cornstarch, and set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, vanilla and sugar. Add the heavy cream and briefly whisk again.
  4. Add the flour, baking powder, salt and ginger powder, and whisk to incorporate. Add the dried fruit and mix in with a spatula.
  5. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Scatter the pearl sugar on top, and place in the oven.
  6. Bake for about 50 minutes, until the top is golden brown, and a toothpick inserted into the canter of the cake comes out clean.
  7. Transfer to a rack. Allow to cool for 10 minutes in the pan before releasing. Let cool to room temperature before slicing.

65 thoughts on “Dried Fruit and Ginger Heavy Cream Cake”

  1. Lovely cake Ronit! It sounds like a cakier and more everyday take on fruitcake! I love how the topping of pearl sugar looks, and it must give the cake a nice crunch. Will have to try that the next time I make a loaf cake 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Laurie, I’m glad you liked the cake. Unlike traditional fruit cake, this one is indeed a simple homey cake, and so quick to make.
      Pearl sugar is such an amazing ingredient. I too love how it looks, and the crunch it adds to cakes.
      I hope you’ll enjoy this taste cake. 🙂
      Looking forward to seeing y

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I prefer moist cakes and breads myself, which is why I don’t enjoy scones and shortbread. However, I can see this toasted, still warm, and spread with good butter. Love how you used your leftover dried fruits.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Carol, I’m glad you liked the cake. It is indeed a tasty way of using leftover dried fruit.
      Using heavy cream makes preparing extra easy. It produces a somewhat drier texture than butter, but in this case it was just what I needed. I hope you’ll enjoy it. 🙂

      Like

  3. Pingback: +5 ( %) – ''

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