Leek and Potato Patties

As I’m planning to prepare these wonderful patties today, I thought it would be a good idea to re-post the recipe, which was posted in the early days of the blog, for those of you who might have missed it.
I’m sure that even those of you who already saw the recipe, will enjoy this tasty remainder.
See you next week with a new recipe!

Tasty Eats

Leek potato patties Ronit Penso Whenever I find fresh, plump leeks at the vegetable store, I grab a few. Their delicate onion flavor is great in many dishes like soups, quiches, risotto, and especially in these tasty leek and potato patties – again from the fabulous Sephardic kitchen. I’m sure you’ll love them once you’ll make them.

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Sephardic Swiss Chard, Potatoes and Cheese Bake

Sephardic Swiss Chard, Potatoes and Cheese Bake Ronit PensoThis tasty bake is well loved in the Sephardic cuisine (check HERE for information about it), and is traditionally served for Saturday brunch. The bake is usually served with Tzatziki (recipe can be found HERE), hard boiled eggs and fresh vegetables or vegetable salad. Another tasty option is to serve it with a bit of date or maple syrup. The combination of sweet and salty is addictive.

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Fried Fish with Agristada – Sephardic Lemon and Egg Sauce

Fried fish with Agristada Ronit PensoAgristada, a velvety lemon and egg sauce, is one of the most loved sauces in Sephardic* cuisine, and one of my personal favorites. The sauce can be served warm or cold, and it is traditionally paired with fried fish, though also served with cooked fish, meatballs or steamed vegetables, especially artichoke. Continue reading

Quince Squares Sweets

As I’ve found some beautiful quince at the store, I’ve decided to make the following tasty treats once again.
Since the recipe was posted in the early days of the blog, I thought it would be good to re-post it, for those of you who might have missed it. I’m sure that even those of you who already saw the recipe, will enjoy this tasty remainder.

See you next week with a new recipe.

Tasty Eats

Sweet and tasty Quince Squares Ronit Penso

As promised, here is another quince recipe.This time it is in the form of sweet and fragrant small bites, made of cooked and slightly dried quince paste.
These lovely sweets are a type of Pate de Fruit, which is the French term for small squares made of reduced fruit juices thickened with gelatin. The difference is that here I rely only on the pectin in the quince to thicken the mixture and no gelatine is added.
As I use unpeeled and coarsely chopped quince for the paste, the result is on the rustic side, which I personally like. Using the unpeeled fruit also helps with getting an all-natural beautiful pinkish-orange color. The color develops while cooking and deepens as the paste dries out.

The origin of the dish is Sephardic, and the recipe I’m using here is based on my grandmother’s recipe for “Dulce de Bimbrio”, a Ladino term for…

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Boyos – Sephardic Savory Pastries

Boyos Ronit PensoAfter the quick and easy recipe post of last week, this week I have for you the very opposite…
The recipe here, from the fabulous traditional Sephardic cuisine, requires some preparation and practice. However, the result is so tasty and uniqe, that I’m sure once you’ll make and taste these wonderful savory pastries, you’ll want to make them again.

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Pearl Onions Sephardic Style

Pearl Onions Sephardic Style Ronit PensoThis simple yet complex side dish is typical to traditional Sephardic cooking: very few ingredients and seasonings, slowly cooked and caramelized in the oven, creating a fragrant and tasty dish.
Granted, this is not a dish you would quickly make, but if you’re home on a cold winter’s day, just place it in the oven and wait for the wonderful results.

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Candied Quince with Honey and Rosemary

Candied Quince with Rosemary and Honey Ronit PensoThe Jewish New Year is about to start on Wednesday, and this brings back memories of traditional foods even to an agnostic such as myself.
One of these culinary traditions is to dip a slice of apple in honey, and eat it as a symbol for a sweet New Year. Many other sweet dishes are added as well, in order to emphasize this hope for a sweet New Year.

Candied quince is one of these dishes in the Sephardic table, and is well worth preparing, regardless of any religious practices.

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